,

TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2022

Session 1: Big Data / 11:45 - 13:15

Title: Integrating Data and Metrics into Clinical Practice 
Presenters: Pamela Roberts, Jeffrey Wertheimer

Title: Association of functional recovery with occupational therapy time and content for inpatient adults with acquired brain injury using electronic health record (EHR) data
Presenters: Alison Cogan, Pamela Roberts

Title: Rehabilitation Service Intensity in Home Health and Impact on Health Outcomes    
Presenter: Chih-Ying Li (Cynthia Li)

Session 2: Big Data / 17:00 - 18:30

Title: Sensor-based physical activity and indoor localization as complement to therapist assessments
Presenters: Pamela Roberts, Ramin Ramzani

Title: Emerging tools for integrating multiple data sources to support therapeutic interventions in the home and community           
Presenters: George Collier, Deborah Backus

Title: Fireside Chat
Moderators: Pamela Roberts and Deborah Backus        
All Big Data Speakers and RehabWeek attendees

WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2022

Session 3: Telehealth and Remote Therapy / 11:45 - 13:15

Title: Advances in Technology Supported Interventions for Speech-Language Therapy: NEUROAGE, Psychosocial Group Intervention, Humanoid Robots, Better Conversations, and Long-term Planning and Assessment of Competencies for Assistive Technologies
Presenters: Fofi Constantinidou, Eva Pettemeridou, Ioulia Solomou, Maja Cepanec, Veronica Montanaro, Anna Volkmer

Session 4: Telehealth and Remote Therapy / 17:00 - 18:30

Title: Non-invasive Methodologies for Monitoring and Treating neurobehavioral Deficits
Presenters: Eva Pettemeridou, Fofi Constantinidou, Alexander Sack

Title: Tele-health Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy in Adults with Post-stroke Upper-extremity Hemiparesis
Presenters: Lynne Gauthier, Alexandra Borstad, Gitendra Uswatte

Title: Sustainable telerehabilitation models of care, guiding principles, reimbursement policies– View from the United States    
Presenter: Tammy Richmond

 

THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2022

Session 5: Emerging Rehab Technologies: State of the Art / 11:45 - 13:15

Title: Adherence to Home Exercise Programs – Clinician Expectations and Goal Setting
Presenters: John Morris

Title: Using Digital Technologies to Monitor and Manage Daily Functional Behaviors in Stroke Survivors
Presenter: Alex Wong

Session 6: User Engagement in Rehab Tech Development / 15:40 - 17:10

Title: Factors affecting patient engagement and use in digital self-monitoring and strategies to promote engagement in technology-based interventions
Presenter: Alex Wong

Title: Manual wheelchair propulsion efficiency: Which design choices are most important?
Presenter: Jacob Misch

Title: Fireside Chat –Emerging Rehabilitation Technology Paradigms: Discoveries from     
Moderator: Pamela Roberts
All ACRM speakers and RehabWeek attendees

Title: Big data to telehealth, sensors, tDCS and user engagement
Moderator: Deborah Backus
All ACRM speakers and RehabWeek attendees

TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2022

11:45 - 13:15

S01 Exoskeletons
Chairs:
Mohamed Bouri & Georg Rauter

013 Assistive Powered Hip Exoskeleton Improves Self-Selected Walking Speed in One Individual with Hemiparesis: A Case Study, Dante Archangeli
022 Design and Feasibility of the T-GRIP Thumb Exoskeleton to Support the Lateral Pinch Grasp of Spinal Cord Injury Patients, Claudia J.W. Haarman
041 The effect of limited sensory information on exoskeleton performance in people with complete spinal cord injury, Eline Zwijgers
O102 Design of Spiral-Cable Forearm Exoskeleton to Assist Supination for Hemiparetic Stroke Subjects, Ava Chen
O14 Knee Exoskeleton Reduces Muscle Effort and Improves Balance During Sit-to-Stand Transitions After Stroke: A Case Study, Sergei Sarkisian
O50 Stair Recognition for Robotic Exoskeleton Control using Computer Vision and Deep Learning, Andrew Garrett Kurbis

17:00 - 18:30

S07 Human-machine interfaces
Chairs:
Lorenzo Masia & Claudio Castellini

019 Comparing the Usability of Alternative EEG Devices to Traditional Electrode Caps for SSVEP-BCI Controlled Assistive Robots, Ana Sofia Santos Cardoso
040 An Analysis of Intention Detection Strategies to Control Advanced Assistive Technologies at the CYBATHLON, Jessica Gantenbein
051 Characterizing Sensory Thresholds and Intensity Sensitivity of Regenerative Peripheral Nerve Interfaces: A Case Study, Michael Gonzalez
068 Evaluation of Multi-Layer Perceptron Neural Networks in Predicting Ankle Dorsiflexion in Healthy Adults Using Movement-Related Cortical Potentials for BCI-Neurofeedback Applications, Ahad Behboodi
072 Scalp-Targeted Haptic Proprioception for Upper-Limb Prosthetics, Michael D. Naish
O107 Control Interface Remapping for Bias-Aware Assistive Teleoperation, Andrew Thompson

 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2022

11:45 - 13:15

S14 Biomechanics and New Technologies and Methodologies in Human Movement Analysis
Chairs
: Rui Loureiro & Laura Marchal Crespo

O52 Quantification of the Development of Trunk Control in Healthy Infants Using Inertial Measurement Units, Katherine Poggensee
O57 Sleep Position Detection for Closed-Loop Treatment of Sleep-Related Breathing Disorders, Alexander Breuss
O59 Development of an Interactive Total Body Robot Enhanced Imitation Therapy for ASD Children, Gabriele Fassina
O67 Correlating Vibration Patterns to Perception of Tactile Information for Long-Term Prosthesis Use and Continued Rehabilitation of Neuropathic Pain, Morenike Abisola Daniella Magbagbeola
O36 Varying Joint Patterns and Compensatory Strategies Can Lead to the Same Functional Gait Outcomes: A Case Study, Tomislav Bacek
O89 Accurate Real-Time Phase Estimation for Normal and Asymmetric Gait, Mohammad Shushtari
 

13:45 - 14:45

ICORR GENERAL ASSEMBLY MEETING

17:00 - 18:30

S21 Design and Development in Rehabilitation Robotics
Chairs:
Robert Riener & Tommaso Lenzi

O24 Towards Unsupervised Rehabilitation: Development of a Portable Compliant Device for Sensorimotor Hand Rehabilitation, Raphael Rätz
O29 Improving Ankle Muscle Recruitment Via Plantar Pressure Biofeedback During Robot Resisted Gait Training in Cerebral Palsy, Zachary Lerner
O34 Haptic Feedback System for Postural Adaptation During Robotic Rehabilitation of Upper Limb, Rakhi Agarwal
O79 Learning Dynamic Patient-Robot Task Assignment and Scheduling for a Robotic Rehabilitation Gym, Bikranta Adhikari
O98 Modeling the Influence of the Human Form and Ambulation Context on Moment and Power-Generating Abilities of Soft Hip-Flexion Exosuits, Ross Michael Neuman
O104 Effect of variable transmission on body-powered prosthetic grasping, Michael Abbott

 

THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2022

11:45 - 13:15

S28 Award Finalists
Chairs:
Ana Luisa Trejos & Edwin van Asseldonk

O48 A Primarily-Passive Knee Prosthesis with Powered Stance and Swing Assistance, Steven Culver
O53 ARMStick - an Intuitive Therapist Interface for Upper-Limb Rehabilitation Robots, Michael Sommerhalder
O60 Spatiotemporal Coupling of Hand and Eye Movements When Using a Myoelectric Prosthetic Hand, Kodi Cheng
O64 Design and Preliminary Evaluation of a Robot-Assisted Assessment-Driven Finger Proprioception Therapy, Monika Zbytniewska-Mégret
O66 Redistributing Ground Reaction Forces During Squatting Using a Cable-Driven Robotic Device, Tatiana D. Luna
O100 Proof-Of-Concept: A Hands-Free Interface for Robot-Assisted Self-Feeding, John Schultz

15:40 - 17:10

S35 Prosthesis, Assistive Robotics, Clinical Evaluation Studies
Chairs:
Emilia Ambrosini & Gerdienke Prange

O9 On the Change in Speech Quality and Speed with a Tongue Interface for Control of Rehabilitation Robotics – a Case Report, Ásgerður A. Pálsdóttir
O20 Evaluation of the implementation of Armeo®Spring in a specialized neurorehabilitation center, Helena Kvist Rindom & Kristine Bach Christensen
O54 Automatic and Personalized Adaptation of Therapy Parameters for Unsupervised Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation: A Pilot Evaluation, Giada Devittori
O55 Adaptive Hybrid FES-Force Controller for Arm Exosuit, Davide Burchielli
O76 Towards Instant Calibration in Myoelectric Prosthetic Hands: A Highly Data-Efficient Controller Based on the Wasserstein Distance, Digby Chappell
O111 A Random Tree Forest Decision Support System to Personalize Upper Extremity Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation in Stroke: A Pilot Study, Cristian Camardella

 

 

 

 

TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2022

Session 1: JOINT SESSION MINT-IISART: Overview of the Rehabilitation Technology Education Landscape – How Can We Join Efforts? / 11:45 - 13:15

In the past, several organizations, such as the IISART education group, the European Robotics Summer School, the CEN, the MiNT Program, the ACRM and the Motus Academy have recognized the need for education in rehabilitation technology. As programs are starting to be developed and implemented, users might find it difficult to know about them, and to select a program that best meets their needs. As the field is still young, most organizers are also basing their program on their own experiences. In this session, we present some of the educational offers and discuss how we can best learn from each other. Speakers will introduce their respective programs. This will be followed by a panel discussion about the common interests and where we can all join forces to improve education for all. Finally, there will be a small “networking” event, where individuals can approach and chat with the representatives from the different programs and discuss opportunities.

 

Session 2: Guided Hands-on Session in the Exhibition / 17:00 - 18:30

In this session, attendees will have the chance to gain some hands on experience in a guided tour to selected booths in the exhibition. The session will contain an introductory presentation about the research state of the art of a specific type of devices, after which the attendees will split up in groups and get to see, try and discuss the respective devices right away. The exact topic and device groups will be defined closer to the event.

 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2022

Session 3: Update on Technology Advances in Neurorehabilitation / 11:45 - 13:15

Speaker: Andres Mayr (Austria)
Title of the talk: Where are We with Robotic Therapy?

Speaker: Cornelius Angerhöfer (Germany)
Title of the talk: Rehab Application for Brain-Computer Interfaces

Speaker: Michael Kaldasch (NL and UAR)
Title of the talk: Digital Technologies in the Metaverse: Applications for Neurorehabilitation

 

 

Session Organized by the WFNR

 WFNR Logo Vertical RGB Full Colour v2

 

Session 4: Guided Hands-on Session in the Exhibition / 17:00 - 18:30

In this session, attendees will have the chance to gain some hands on experience in a guided tour to selected booths in the exhibition. The session will contain an introductory presentation about the research state of the art of a specific type of devices, after which the attendees will split up in groups and get to see, try and discuss the respective devices right away. The exact topic and device groups will be defined closer to the event.

  

THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2022

Session 5: What Kind of Research Project do we Need Now and in the Future? / 11:45 - 13:15

Over the last 20 years, there has been a lot of research on the application of rehabilitation technology. However, with currently used study designs, and constraints due to ethics, reimbursement structures, clinic organizations or other don’t seem to optimize the use of rehabilitation technology within these studies. For example, while we are all aware that technology should be used to intensify therapy, many studies still match for therapy time provided. Also, while we are aware that technology has the best effect on those most affected and early after injury, many studies still include individuals with mild functional deficits in a chronic state. In this session we ask ourselves if the traditional study designs are still the way to go or if we should open our minds to other ways of providing evidence. We ask ourselves what the big topics are and if we really still need dose-matched effectiveness studies. Speakers will share examples of their own daily life and struggles and attendees will discuss in small groups what they think is important for the future and where the field needs to go.

Speakers: TBC

TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2022

11:50 - 12:35

Keynote Lecture
Neuromodulation and Neuroplasticity Moderated by Electrical Stimulation

Chairs: Thomas Janssen & Simona Ferrante
Speakers: Milos Popovic & Matija Milosevic

12.40 - 13:15

 IFESS Fast Forward poster pitches

Neuromuscular electrical stimulation as a spasticity reduction tool before functional hand training in a person with stroke: case report, Aitor Martín-Odriozola

Low Frequency Alternating Current Block-Activation Window: In-silico Predictions, Nathaniel Lazorchak

Strain-relief mechanism for implantable neural microelectrodes, Soroush Mirkiani

Functional electrical stimulation pulse shape: Effect on comfort-related preference in individuals without neurological impairments, Lazar I. Jovanovic

Electrical stimulation to prevent recurring pressure ulcers in individuals with a spinal cord injury: a study protocol, Boas Wijker

Application of cutaneous transabdominal electrical stimulation for the treatment of constipation due to irritable bowel syndrome, Paul Taylor

Feasibility of leg trajectory modulation with transcranial magnetic stimulation in human, Rose Guay Hottin

Foot movement reaction time following electrical stimulation of the lower leg: A Methodological study, Nebojsa Malesevic

Neuromuscular Reinforcement Learning to Actuate Human Limbs through FES, Nat Wannawas

Smart textile with functional electrical stimulation and movement sensor integrated for hand exercise, Kai Yang

A pilot trial of a custom designed 8-pad electrode and a set of 16 dynamic patterns for providing tactile feedback to first responders, Jovana Malešević

Functional Electrical Stimulation as a Diagnostic Tool, Khin Bo

Investigating neural connectivity in lower limb amputees during motor imagery and motor movement, Britta Meyer

17:00 - 18:30

Emerging Technologies and Applications
Chairs: Jonathan Jarvis & Christine Azevedo

17.00-17.15 A model-based identification procedure of stimulation angular ranges for FES cycling, Nicole Sanna

17.15-17.30 In-Vivo Testing of a Novel Wireless Intraspinal Microstimulation Interface for Restoration of Motor Function Following Spinal Cord Injury, Omar Tawakol

17.30-17.45 Transcutaneous electrical sensory thresholds with different waveforms and frequencies, Eukene Imatz-Ojanguren

17.45-18.00 Closed-loop parameter optimisation for patient-specific phrenic nerve stimulation, Conor Keogh

18.00-18.15 A hybrid fes-motor cooperative control over a knee joint movement: a feasibility study, Francesca Dell'Eva

18.15-18.30 Position control of two finger joints using functional electrical stimulation, Minami Kawashima

 

17:00 - 18:30
IFESS Reception

 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2022

 

11:45 – 12:30

Keynote Lecture
Epidural and non-invasive spinal cord stimulation: great accomplishments - problematic PR

Chairs: Thierry Keller & Tamsyn Street
Speaker: Winfried Mayer

12:30 – 13:15

Neuromuscular and spinal cord stimulation

12.30-12.45 The effects of transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation delivered with and without high frequency modulation on spinal and corticospinal excitability, Danielle Konig

12.45-13.00 Simultaneous modulation of frequency and amplitude improves discriminability of electrical stimulation, Shima Gholinezhad

13.00-13.15 A surface neuromuscular electrical stimulation device for universal cartesian force control in humans, Marek Sierotowicz

17:00 - 18:30

FES in Clinical Practice
Chairs:
Tamsyn Street & Matija Milosevic

17.00-17.15 Clinical practice guideline development for using fes to support walking: a delphi consensus study, Cathy Bulley

17.15-17.30 Key challenges in functional electrical stimulation clinical practice guideline implementation, Lisa Brown

17.30-17.45 Damage to the lower motor neuron of the intrinsic musculature and consequences for the therapeutic treatment of the hand in tetraplegia, Ines Bersch

Hybrid FES Applications and Brain Computer Interfacing (45 min)

17.45-18.00 Electrical interference in non-invasive brain-computer interface-controlled functional electrical stimulation: Offline analysis and practical considerations, Lazar I. Jovanovic

18.00-18.15 The effect of hybrid neuroprostheses on the rehabilitation of upper extremity impairment after stroke: a systematic review, Chiara Höhler

18.15-18.30 iCARE – Intelligent Sensing and Actuation Solution for At-home Rehabilitation using FES and Exoskeleton, Je Hyung Jung

 

THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2022

 

11:45 – 12:30

Keynote Lecture
Electrical stimulation-induced muscle activity to fight secondary complications after spinal cord injury: what’s the use?

Chairs: Winfried Mayr & Tamsyn Street
Speaker:
Thomas Janssen

12:30 – 13:15

Electrical  Stimulation to Reduce Secondary Complications

12.30-12.45 Effectiveness of NMES and Taping on Diastasis Recti in Postnatal Women, Suraj Kanase

12.45-13.00 Electrical stimulation for paralyzed muscles increases energy expenditure in people with spinal cord injury, Yiming Ma

13.00-13.15 Functional electrical stimulation for sexual functioning in spinal cord injury for men: a case study, Neil Marshall


13:45 - 14:45
General Assembly Meeting

 

15:40 - 17:10

Electrical Stimulation to Restore Function

Chairs: Erika Spaich & Ken Yoshida

15.40-15.55 Functional electrical stimulation 1950 - 2022: a 72 years bibliometric analysis, Nur Azah Hamzaid

15.55-16.10 Effect of the Neuromuscular electrical stimulation on laryngeal movement in the post-stroke dysphagia, Yeong Hwan Ryu

16.10-16.25 Effectiveness of fes for upper motor neuron lesion walking impairment: overview of systematic reviews, Jane Burridge

16.25-16.40 Multi-contact epineural electrical stimulation to restore upper-limb functions, Christine Azevedo

16.40-16.55 Functional electrical stimulation for hand function rehabilitation after stroke: a systematic review, Aitor Martín-Odriozola

16.55-17.10 The Orthotic and Training Effects of Peroneal Nerve Functional Electrical Simulation in Parkinson’s Disease: Post Hoc Analysis from a Feasibility Study for a Randomised Control Trial, Paul Taylor

TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2022

Session 1: Blended rehabilitation: challenges in integrating eHealth in rehabilitation care / 11:45 - 13:15

Target audience

Physicians, health professionals, private partners (e.g. developers, companies), public partners (e.g. authorities), health insurance companies, patients, researchers.

Content

  1. Overview by means of the CEHRES-roadmap in co-creation in iterative development, implementation and evaluation (10 minutes). Jorit Meesters
  2. Challenges in development in co-creation (20 minutes). Lex van Velsen
  3. Challenges in implementation (unavailable: (20 minutes). To be announced
  4. Challenges in evaluation (20 minutes). Stephanie Kosterink
  5. Panel discussion (20 minutes). Speakers and audience

Summary

Using eHealth to provide blended rehabilitation care has the potential to improve outcomes, reduce costs and enhance self-management of patients. The development, implementation and evaluation of blended rehabilitation care is however challenging. This mini-symposium introduces the CEHRES roadmap as a model to facilitate these co-creative processes and enhance the collaboration between stakeholders (e.g. developers, patients, health professionals and researchers).

After the introduction of the CEHRES roadmap several experts present the challenges in the development, implementation and evaluation from their own perspective but also in relation to the other stakeholders.

Challenges in development in co-creation: Lex van Velsen
Co-creation is a buzzword for developing eHealth. But what exactly is co-creation? And how can I use co-creation to my advantage? By presenting different examples of eHealth development processes, I will show good practices and pitfalls, so that the participant knows how to involve end-users in design.

Challenges in implementation: speaker to be announced

Challenges in evaluation: Stephanie Kosterink

There is a discrepancy between the evaluation of eHealth and tradition research methodology. These methodology, as randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are time consuming and hamper the development of technology. To support the implementation of eHealth and blended rehabilitation care it is important to go beyond these tradition research methodology and focus on more pragmatic research methodologies.

Objectives

The objectives of this mini symposium are to present and discuss:

  • The importance and complexity of co-creation in developing, implementing and evaluating blended rehabilitation care
  • Research methods for evaluating blended care
  • Implementation strategies for blended care

Speakers:


Session 2: From in-center to at-home rehabilitation: the wearable solution / 17:00 - 18:30

Summary

With an aging population the number of patients who need rehabilitation care is expected to increase. This increase in care demands is accompanied by a decrease in available care professionals. Besides, traditional objective assessments such as gait analysis, is time consuming and expensive. This poses a major challenge to adequate resource allocation in rehabilitation. More simple assessment and unsupervised rehabilitation treatment at home is expected to address this problem. Hence, there is an urgent need for technology-supported assessment and treatment at home, with the supervision of a therapist only if needed. In this symposium, examples of innovative developments and potential “in real-life” applications will be presented.

Speakers: 

  • Johannes (Hans) Bussmann, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the Netherlands

    An interactive tool for self-directed, home-based and personalized arm rehabilitation after stroke

    After stroke intensive arm therapy is essential for gaining and retaining functional improvements. Because of high costs, shortage of therapists, patient burden and adherence issues, intensive arm treatment is scarcely applied, and this will become even more challenging in the future. Therefore, there is an urgent need for sustainable, technology-supported and motivating treatment in the home setting, with direct supervision of a therapist only if needed.

    This was the background of several research projects aiming at the development and evaluation of a new and interactive therapy aid based on movement sensors to assess, stimulate and optimize the daily use and exercise of the affected arm in the home environment by objective, personalized feedback to the patient and his/her therapist. In the presentation the tool will be described in more detail, as well as the results of the studies performed so far and the plans for the future.

  • Jaap Buurke, University of Twente, The Netherlands

    Enabling 3D movement analysis in everyday clinical practice

    In current clinical practice, 3D movement analysis is an important tool to assess patients and guide clinical decision making. It provides objective data about individual balance and walking patterns. 3D movement analysis however is lab based, expensive and labour and time intensive. Wearable sensors are cheap and easy to apply within limited amount of time. As such, wearable sensors not only have the potential to replace expensive lab based 3D opto-electronic devices but also offer the possibility to assess individuals outside the lab during therapy or in their natural environment.

  • Charissa Roossien, University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands

    Sensor technologies for sustainable employability

    Sensor technologies are of interest to monitor and improve the workload and health of workers. The main challenge is to reliable monitor the individual workload without interfering with workability. Sensor technologies for occupational rehabilitation must be developed, validated and implemented to gain sustainable employability. 

  • Laura Marchal-Crespo, Technical University Delft, the Netherlands

    Towards minimally supervised hyper-realistic robotic rehabilitation.

    Sensorimotor impairments of the hand after stroke can drastically reduce the ability to perform activities of daily living. To promote recovery of the lost functions, there is an increasing interest in minimally supervised and unsupervised rehabilitation to increase therapy dosage and complement conventional therapy. Novel portable robotic devices are been developed, which together with immersive virtual reality using low-cost head mounted displays, could potentially provide a safe, intuitive, naturalistic training environment. Rehabilitation games that leverage interactive tangible game elements with diverse haptic characteristics to provide somatosensory training might further foster recovery.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2022

Session 3: Advanced prosthetics development; are we still in control? / 11:45 - 13:15

Target audience

Physicians, health professionals, researchers, engineers, private partners (e.g. developers, companies), patients.

Content

This session will cover developments in the field of lower and upper limb prosthetics with focus on motor learning and motor control of advanced prosthetics

Summary

Prostheses for lower or upper limbs support the performance of task-specific activities in people after limb amputation or limb reduction defects and are of great importance in obtaining and maintaining the user's independence. New developments in prosthetics for both the lower and upper limbs are increasingly aimed at refining the motor control of the prosthesis as well that of the user. But how does this motor learning process take place and what sensory information is indispensable? Or does the future prosthesis regulate all that itself? In the next session, these aspects of prosthetic control will be discussed.

Objectives

  • To provide new developments on control mechanism in prosthetics
  • Discuss new methods on learning to control lower limb prothesis
  • To discuss a framework of closed-loop motor control in upper limb prosthetics.
  • To provide clinical knowledge to teach functional skills in upper limb prosthesis users 

Chairs:

  • Han Houdijk PhD
  • Hans Rietman MD, PhD

Speakers:

  • Erik Prinsen PT, Ph.D. (20 min): Intent recognition for the control of lower limb prostheses using inertial sensors and EMG

    The current generation of lower-limb protheses is only limitedly able to adapt to different walking environments. The introduction of power prosthetic components have paved the way to improve this adaptability to different gait tasks. To be able to achieve this, it is paramount that the user intention for different gait tasks (for instance, stair walking) can be detected. Recent research has shown that using inertial sensors and EMG can contribute to developing robust classification algorithms for motor intent. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of the work that we did in the H2020-project MyLeg in which we used inertial sensors combined with either bipolar, multi-array and fine-wire EMG to classify motor intent for a wide range of different motor tasks.

  • He (Helen) Huang, Ph.D. (20 min): Personalizing Robotic Lower Limb Prostheses Using Reinforcement Learning

    Robotic lower limb prosthesis is the state-of-the-art technology in clinics to help amputees to restore their motor function. However, current designs cannot accommodate inter- and intra-amputee variations automatically. To cope with such variations, a subset of the parameters controlling the prosthesis is often tuned manually and heuristically, which is time and labor intensive. In this talk, I will discuss our recently effort in developing an automatic tuning method based on reinforcement learning for robotic transfemoral prostheses to achieve personalized gait assistance. Our innovation may lead to a new clinical solution that is generalizable to computerized lower limb prostheses to enable user adaptation in the future.

  • Strahinja Dosen, Ph.D. (20 min): Artificial sensory feedback inspired by human motor control

    Closing the control loop by providing artificial sensory feedback to a user of a hand prosthesis is an important step towards achieving complete bionic replacement. Despite important recent developments, designing effective feedback that will improve prosthesis utility in realistic conditions is still a challenge. In this lecture, we will propose that effective feedback can be developed starting from the deep understanding of human motor control in the context of prosthesis use, rather than ad-hoc technical solutions. We will propose a conceptual framework of closed-loop motor control and illustrate how such a framework can be used to inspire novel approaches to sensory feedback. Finally, we will briefly touch upon our recent efforts towards clinical translation of the novel methods.

  • Liselotte Hermansson, OT Ph.D. (20 min): Acquisition of functional skills in upper limb prosthesis users

    During the presentation I will demonstrate and talk about how we teach prosthesis use and functional skills to upper limb prosthesis users, both children and adults. The training goes from integrating the prosthesis into the body scheme to control of advanced myoelectric multi-grip hands. Establishing wearing habits, learning motor control and motor skills through activity performance support users’ benefit of the myoelectric hand. From our clinical studies we find that in most patients these skills are maintained throughout growth and ageing.

Session 4: Designing for children / 17:00 - 18:30    

Target audience

Physicians, health professionals, private partners (e.g. developers, companies), public partners (e.g. authorities), health insurance companies, patients, researchers.

Speakers:

  • Mathieu Gielen, Co-design with children (25 min)

If your product or service has an impact on children’s lives, it is important to ground its design on an empathic understanding of children’s wishes, needs and perspectives. It can mean the difference between a highly appreciated and intensively used product – or a flop. Within the world of innovation, increasing attention is given to co-design with children and related participatory approaches. It allows children to form and express their opinions and inform the design team, not just on core functionalities but on a rich palette of features that determine children’s experience. Mathieu Gielen, Assistant Professor in Designing for and with Children at Delft University of Technology, will highlight the possibilities and pitfalls of involving children in your innovation processes.

  • Iris van Wijk / Edwin Verbrugge, Prosthetics for children (25 min)

To achieve optimal use of prostheses in children, other considerations apply than in adults. The young child is still developing its motor abilities; it grows; it handles a prosthesis in ways that differ from adult handling; other user requirementsmight apply. Iris van Wijk, pediatric rehabilitation consultant at rehabilitation center De Hoogstraat Utrecht will introduce child-specific considerations in upper limb prosthetics; Edwin Verbrugge, CPO at Rijndam Orthopaedics will illustrate pediatric aspects of lower limb prosthetics.

  • Ruud van der Wel/Karin van Dijk, Enabling gaming for children with disabilities (25 min)

Gaming is an important form of leisure and social interaction for children. Ruud van der Wel and Karin van Dijk of NMA Gaming foundation will speak about creating unique adaptations to enable disabled children to play regular games and implementing these adaptations in the target audience.

  • Panel discussion: Speakers and audience (15 min)

 

Objectives

The objectives of this mini symposium are to present and discuss:

  • Principles of co-designing with children
  • Age-related considerations in designing prosthetics and adaptations
  • Practical solutions and approaches for individual adaptations for children

Chair:

Robert Pangalila, MD PhD pediatric rehabilitation consultant, Rijndam rehabilitation and Erasmus University Medical Centre

Speakers:

  • Mathieu Gielen, MSc Assistant Professor in Designing for and with Children at Delft University of Technology, m.a.gielen@tudelft.nl
  • Iris van Wijk, MD PhD pediatric rehabilitation consultant, rehabilitation centre De Hoogstraat Utrecht, i.v.wijk@dehoogstraat.nl
  • Edwin Verbrugge, CPO Rijndam Orthopaedics Rotterdam, EVerbrugge@rijndam.nl
  • Ruud van der Wel, NMA gaming; respiratory therapist, Rijndam rehabilitation, rvdwel@rijndam.nl
  • Karin van Dijk, NMA gaming

 

THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2022

Session 5: Exoskeletons for individuals with a spinal cord injury: a historic perspective, current state-of-the-art and future developments / 11:45 - 13:15

Target audience

Physicians, health professionals, researchers, engineers, private partners (e.g. developers, companies), patients.

Content

This session will cover developments in the field of exoskeletons for the lower extremity with a special emphasis on individuals with a spinal cord injury.

Summary

Exoskeletons allow individuals with a spinal cord injury to walk again, instead of being confined to a wheelchair. Besides the fact that being able to walk again is empowering for individuals with a spinal cord injury, it has additional benefits such as better endurance and improved bladder and bowel control. However, there are several challenges with the respect to the clinical application of exoskeletons of which balance control is the major one. This session will provide a historic perspective, the state-of-the-art and future developments of exoskeletons for individuals with a spinal cord injury. 

Objectives

  • To provide an overview of the current state-of-the-art of exoskeletons
  • Discuss ways to improve balance control of exoskeletons
  • To provide an overview of future developments of exoskeletons

Chairs:

Ilse van Nes, MD, PhD

Erik Prinsen, PhD

Speakers:

  • Ilse van Nes MD, PhD , The clinical use of an exoskeleton in people with complete Spinal Cord Injury (20 min)

    People with a complete spinal cord injury are fully dependent on the wheelchair for their mobility. Due to the current technological developments, they have the possibility to walk again. In this presentation an overview about the history of walking in paraplegic patients will be presented and I will also inform you about the latest developments in this area. Key-factors that are necessary for a successful implementation of an innovation will be mentioned. Also the results of our research on the use of the exoskeleton at home will be shown.

  • Edwin van Asseldonk PhD
    Using exoskeletons to support balance control in healthy persons and persons with spinal cord injury (20 min)

    One of the ongoing challenges in exoskeletons and an often-heard wish of their users is to support balance control and recovery and in doing so decrease need to rely on crutches or canes. Here we will present the recent efforts to improve balance control of exoskeleton users while standing and walking.
     
  • Heike Vallery, PhD (20 min)
    To be announced

  • Lieke RoelofsProject MARCH (20 min)
    Project MARCH has one vision, we believe that we can use technology to improve the quality of life for people with paraplegia. We are a non-profit student team of the TU Delft, and consists of people from various backgrounds and years of studies. Each year a new team comes in to build on the knowledge of past years. With the help of our pilot, a paraplegic, we are pushing the boundaries in exoskeleton technology to build an exoskeleton ready for daily use. In this short presentation, we take you along our journey, and show you what our plans for 2022 are.

Session 6: Manual wheeled mobility / 15:40 - 17:10

Target audience

Physicians, health professionals (PT’s and OT’s), researchers, engineers, private partners (e.g. developers, companies), patients.

Content

During this session recent innovations will be presented and discussed from a multi-disciplinary perspective, including rehabilitation physicians, engineers and human movement scientists.

Summary

Manual wheelchair users depend on their upper-body for all their activities, yet overuse injuries and limited physical capacity are still very common. Support of these individuals should not only be aimed at their primary need for mobility, but also at the need of being able to exercise and enjoy sports for a healthy lifestyle, to maintain and improve participation according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability & Health. To that end, the proper design and fitting, correct skill training and the assessment thereof are crucial.

Chairs:

  • Prof dr. Hans Rietman
  • Riemer Vegter

Presenters:

Riemer Vegter, Assistant Professor (NL) (15min):

  • dr. Rory Cooper (USA)(15min):
    • Transforming Wheelchair Design and Fabrication https://www.shrs.pitt.edu/people/rory-cooper
    • Manual wheelchairs and those used for most sports applications are based on structures designed and fabricated with tubes. This approach has dominated for nearly 90-years. However, new engineering approaches and machines may make it possible to transforms wheelchair design with the goal of reducing cost to the consumer and improving quality. New manual wheelchairs designs and processes will be introduced. 

  • Reto Togni, PhD-student (CH)(15min)
    • Leaning for Turning: Novel Steering Technologies in Manual Wheelchairs promise more delightful, intuitive and efficient physical activity
    • https://www.linkedin.com/in/reto-togni-8a4b16121/?originalSubdomain=ch
    • Manual Wheelchairs do not steer but are turned by braking unilaterally. This has been described to be frustrating, challenging and inefficient while requiring constant use of both hands. With “Leaning for Turning”, we aim to establish a new paradigm in the design of manual wheelchairs based on the principle of using the backrest for directing kinetic energy. This enables natural and dynamic movement, facilitates easier one-handed propulsion and promotes healthier physical activity by activating core musculature while relieving the upper extremities. The iterative development process of steering technologies in manual wheelchairs was fuelled by the systematic evaluation of various movement characteristics with users to ensure save, controlled and comfortable use across different functional groups. The resulting prototype was instrumented with force sensors to compare conventional and steered wheelchair propulsion in a series of experiments where 15 able-bodied volunteers and a group of 15 wheelchair users with various physical abilities (and pathologies ranging from amputation to complete cervical spinal cord injury) completed a standardized course in both configurations. This talk draws preliminary conclusions from this juxtaposition and explores implications of key findings – chief among which is a drastic improvement of overall energy efficiency in manual wheelchair propulsion thanks to the ability to control direction without braking. 

  • Sonja de Groot (NL)(15min), Associate Professor
    • Implementation of a wheelchair propulsion laboratory in clinical practice
    • https://research.vu.nl/en/persons/sonja-de-groot
    • To prevent overuse injuries and to obtain and maintain mobility and develop an active lifestyle, both wheelchair (e.g. mass, tyre pressure) and user (e.g. fitness, propulsion technique in terms of force application on the rim) must be in the best condition. Furthermore, the wheelchair-user interface (e.g. seat height, rim and wheel diameter) needs to be ergonomically tuned to the best wheeling performance in different environments for the specific individual. Despite a considerable number of studies by several research groups into wheelchair propulsion over the last 30 years, to date wheelchair fitting is a personalized professional skill that has little scientific foundation. Furthermore, monitoring the propulsion technique and physical strain of new wheelchair users in Dutch rehabilitation is not common practice. However, this approach can be useful to optimize the wheelchair, the interface, and to educate the user in establishing the best propulsion technique, to improve physical capacity and prevent upper-extremity overuse injuries. For implementing a wheelchair propulsion laboratory in clinical practice standardized testing and proper interpretation of individual outcomes is important. 

  • Dr. Felix Chenier, Associate Professor (CAN)(15min)
    • Reporting and interpreting shoulder angles in wheelchair propulsion
    • https://crir.ca/en/member/felix-chenier-ph-d-ing/
    • Shoulder angles are unambiguous for movements that are confined to standard anatomic planes. However, functional movements such as propelling a wheelchair combine multiple planes, and therefore shoulder angles are more ambiguous in these conditions. Over the years, many conventions have been used to represent shoulder angles: attitude vector/quaternion, cardan angles, Euler angles, and the Globe system. However, these methods fail to represent shoulder angles in a way that is both easily and correctly interpreted by practitioners, and free of numerical instability such as gimbal lock. The recently introduced Tilt-and-Torsion (TT) method is an extension of the Euler YXY method, the latter being recommended by the International Society of Biomechanics. Like Euler YXY, TT uses the plane of elevation, elevation, and humeral rotation to express shoulder angles, but it reports the humeral rotation independently from the plane of elevation. In this presentation, we overview the impact of using different methods to express shoulder angles in wheelchair propulsion with 10 wheelchair basketball athletes who sprinted in straight line using a sports wheelchair. During these sprints, humeral rotation ranged from 14° (externally) to 13° when expressed using TT, which is consistent with typical maximal ranges of humeral rotation, compared to 65° to 50° with Euler YXY. We also present why TT is less affected by gimbal lock compared to the other methods.

 

 

TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2022

11:45 - 13:15

Title: Virtual Reality for Cognition and Attention – 1
Chair: Phillipe Archambault

Podium Presentations (11:45-12:15)

BrightGo System for Remote Cognitive Therapy, Grigore Burdea

Visual Attention in Virtual Reality: Comparing Visual Feedback and Competition in A Virtual Cycling Environment (VCYCLE-Competition), John Palmieri

Guest speaker from VR4Rehab (12:20-13:15)
Speaker: René Luigies

 

17:00 - 18:30

Title: Virtual Reality in Stroke
Chair: Iris Brunner

Podium Presentations

Do We Need to Focus on A Longer Training Intervention?, Alma Merians

Combining custom virtual reality and non-custom serious games- both in person and via telehealth  for the comprehensive rehabilitation of a person post-stroke, Judith Deutsch

Virtual Reality Based Interventions Reduce Levels of Post-Stroke Depressive Symptoms: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis, Sandeep Subramanian

 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2022

11:45 - 13:15

Title: Technological aspects
Chair: W. Geoff Wright

Podium Presentations

Design of a Mixed Reality Environment for the extrapolation of Reference Trajectories in Upper-Limb Rehabilitation, Anna Bucchieri

Onboard gait detection crutches for gait rehabilitation, Marco Ghidelli

MyoCognition, a rehabilitation platform using serious games controlled with myoelectric pattern recognition, Morten Kristoffersen

Novel dry fabric electrodes suitable for clinical myolectric control, Strahinja Dosen

 

17:00 - 18:30

Title: Virtual Reality for Psychological aspects – 2
Chair: Gerry Fluet


Podium Presentations

Applying virtual reality and machine learning for the assessment of unilateral spatial neglect: The immersive virtual road crossing task (iVRoad), Julia Belger

Design and Evaluation of Virtual Reality Environments for Claustrophobia, Markéta Kolman Jablonská

Mixed Reality to stimulate Prosociality in Children with Social Challenges, Olga Gali

Cybersickness in Custom-Made Virtual Reality Exergames for Older Adults, John Edison Munoz Cardona

 

THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2022

11:45 - 13:15

Title: Virtual Reality for Posture and Balance
Chair: Alma Merians

Podium Presentations (11:45-12:35)

Attentional focus instructions show order effects during a virtual reality balance training task, W. Geoffrey Wright

Virtual body alterations have real motor consequences, Valentin Vallageas

Towards the optimal virtual reality exergame approach for balance therapy in persons with neurological disorders: a Rasch analysis, Evelyne Wiskerke

Early Career Awardee Talk (12:45-13:15)

Speaker: Athanasios (Thanos) Vourvopoulos
Lecture Title: Brain-Computer Interfacing and Virtual Reality for Upper Limb Neurorehabilitation

15:40 - 17:10

Title: Virtual Reality for Posture and Gait
Chair: Judith Deutsch


Podium Presentations

Comparison of Postural Kinematics Between a Wireless Virtual Reality Headset and Research-Grade Motion Capture, William Wright

Feasibility and Acceptance of an Immersive Virtual Reality System during Robot Assisted Gait Training (Lokomat) for Individuals with Neurological Diseases: a study protocol in a clinical setting, Zlatko Matjačić

First Steps Towards Accelerating the Learning of Using Exoskeletons with Immersive Virtual Reality, Antonio Rodríguez-Fernández

Interaction of Visual Flow in a Head-Mounted Display and Self-Paced Treadmill Walking Speed, Elizabeth B. Wilson

TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2022

Session 1: JOINT SESSION MINT-IISART: Overview of the Rehabilitation Technology Education Landscape – How Can We Join Efforts? / 11:45 - 13:15

In the past, several organizations, such as the IISART education group, the European Robotics Summer School, the CEN, the MiNT Program, the ACRM and the Motus Academy have recognized the need for education in rehabilitation technology. As programs are starting to be developed and implemented, users might find it difficult to know about them, and to select a program that best meets their needs. As the field is still young, most organizers are also basing their program on their own experiences. In this session, we present some of the educational offers and discuss how we can best learn from each other. Speakers will introduce their respective programs. This will be followed by a panel discussion about the common interests and where we can all join forces to improve education for all. Finally, there will be a small “networking” event, where individuals can approach and chat with the representatives from the different programs and discuss opportunities

Session 2 / 17:00 - 18:30

Title: Collaboration through MINT Academy - Networking to Standardise Neurotechnology Education and Clinical Application

Speakers:
Helen Hobbs, Director (Hobbs Rehabilitation, UK)
Amy Dennis-Jones, Specialist Neurological Physiotherapist (Hobbs Rehabilitation, UK)
Robert Riener, President (MotusAcademy, Switzerland)

WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2022

Session 3 / 11:45 - 13:15

Title: Education through MiNT Academy - Transforming Clinicians into Clinical Device Specialists and Extracting Data for Companies

Speakers:
Helen Hobbs, Director (Hobbs Rehabilitation, UK)
Alison Watt, Specialist Neurological and Research Physiotherapist (Hobbs Rehabilitation, UK)
Rachael Edwards, Specialist Neurological Occupational Therapist (Hobbs Rehabilitation, UK)
Chrissy Bibby, Specialist Neurological Speech and Language Therapist (Hobbs Rehabilitation, UK)
Amy Dennis-Jones, Specialist Neurological Physiotherapist (Hobbs Rehabilitation, UK)
Adam Parkinson, Clinical Application Specialist (Tyromotion, Austria)

Session 4 / 17:00 - 18:30

Title: Product Development through MiNT - Designing Clinically Appropriate Devices in the Complex Arena of Neurorehabilitation

Speakers:
Amy Dennis-Jones, Specialist Neurological Physiotherapist (Hobbs Rehabilitation, UK)
Katlin Kreamer-Tonin, Product Manager (ABLE Human Motion, Spain)
Alfons Carnicero, CEO (ABLE Human Motion, Spain)
Alison Watt, Specialist Neurological and Research Physiotherapist (Hobbs Rehabilitation, UK)
Laura Marriott, Specialist Neurological Occupational Therapist (Hobbs Rehabilitation, UK)
Eve Gregoriou, CEO (NeuroVirt, UK)
Carolina Bell, Co-founder and Business & Finance Lead (NeuroVirt, UK)

THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2022

Session 5 / 11:45 - 13:15

Title: Research through MiNT - The Crucial Involvement of Clinical Partnerships in Future Product Development

Speakers:
Chrissy Bibby, Specialist Neurological Speech and Language Therapist (Hobbs Rehabilitation, UK)
Rachael Edwards, Specialist Neurological Occupational Therapist (Hobbs Rehabilitation, UK)
Amy Dennis-Jones, Specialist Neurological Physiotherapist (Hobbs Rehabilitation, UK)
David Fried, CEO (Evolv, Spain)

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